Samsung Galaxy S7 edge Review and Specifications

Design



Design hasn't always been Samsung's strong suit. Just two years ago, Samsung released the Galaxy S5. The handset was the most powerful phone available at the time, but it wasn’t a looker. Last year’s Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge signalled a much needed change for Samsung, and the change is only more obvious with the S7 Edge.

Along the top is the repositioned sim-tray, which now pops in a microSD slot too, plus a microphone. The bottom houses the headphone jack (this should always be on the bottom, can other manufacturers please take note), another microphone, a tiny and frankly disappointing speaker, plus a microUSB port for charging.


But, the biggest change between the S6 Edge from last year and the Galaxy S7 Edge is the size. Instead of simply keeping both the Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge the same, with just the Edge sides to differentiate them, Samsung has positioned the Edge as the ‘higher-end’ device, pushing up the screen size from 5.1-inches to 5.5-inches.



Samsung has once again decided not to use on-screen buttons, so glowing ‘back’ and ‘multitasking’ keys light up when needed. Ditching virtual buttons gives you more screen space, but this phone could be even more compact if Samsung went down that route.

Samsung's also redesigned the Galaxy S7 Edge's camera module. Unlike the S6's, the S7 Edge's module sits flat on the phone's back. This might sound like a small change, but it makes a big difference. I can now tap out a text with the phone flat on my desk without it jumping and rocking from side to side.
Screen


If the design of the S7 Edge is stunning, then the same word can be used to describe the display. Not a whole lot has changed from the outgoing flagships, but this still holds up as the best screen on a smartphone for a number of reasons.
First up is the sheer amount of detail here. Samsung didn’t try and go all-out with a 4K display, but really when quad-HD (that’s 2560 x 1440) looks this good I don’t think there’s much of a need for more pixels. Maybe it would help make VR even better with the Gear VR headset, but that’ll probably come next year.

Samsung Galaxy S7 Review and Specifications

Design

The design of the Galaxy S7 looks pretty much like that of the Galaxy S6 – or so you'd think when you first lay eyes on it. The phone, from the front, does have a very similar look, with the metal edges and rounded corners.
But the rear of the phone has been rounded away (think the S6 Edge's front used on the back) in the same manner as on the Galaxy Note 5, and it feels completely different.
On top of that, Samsung's brought back the IP68 rating (meaning you can dunk it in 1.5 meters of water for 30 minutes) that we last saw on the Galaxy S5 – but this time, with the more premium design of glass and metal.
It's still a touch chunkier than other phones on the market, but it feels good in the hand, and the mix of glass and metal makes it feel like a phone worth spending a decent amount of cash on.
Screen
Samsung stuck with the same 5.1-inch QHD Super AMOLED display on the Galaxy S7 as on the S6. It's usually a bad thing when a brand doesn't add anything to the mix for its phone from one year to the next (we're talking to you, Apple…) but in this case, last year's screen was so nifty that it couldn't have been improved on much this year.
Super AMOLED tech means you're already getting great color reproduction and brilliant differences between the light and dark elements of the screen – and the results always seem to impress friends.
The QHD resolution is pin-sharp too – at 1,440 x 2,560 pixels it's closing in on a resolution that's so sharp the eye can't ever see the pixels.
It makes pictures and web pages, in particular, look smooth and clear, and as OLED technology is self-emitting, the display sits closer to the glass too. Side by side the two do actually look a little different, with the Galaxy S7 showing up as a little brighter - Samsung's clearly optimized the tech while not changing the resolution.

Samsung Galaxy V Review and Specifications


The Samsung Galaxy V is a simple yet powerful smartphone. It comes packed with an array of features, including the powerful Android OS. Enjoy taking photos on the Galaxy V with the 3 MP main camera, recording HD videos and stay connected without much effort through Bluetooth, GPRS, 3G broadband and WiFi connectivity.
Key Features
    • Featuring an array of calling and messaging features such as predicative text messaging, picture messaging (MMS), video messaging (MMS), email client and a hands free speaker phone, making it easy to stay connected.
    • Snap or record your favourite moments with the 3 MP main camera and HD video shooting options.
    • Stay entertained with the Galaxy V as it features a media player, 3.5mm headset jack and web browsing options.
    • Enjoy all these features and more in the 4ÔÇØ LCD capacitive touch display, which boasts a 480x800 pixel resolution.

    Samsung Galaxy S6 Review and Specifications


    Design
    Samsung's gone bold on the design of the Galaxy S6, taking away the usual plastic covering that festooned previous models and finally stepping into the world of metal for its flagships.
    Screen
    Samsung has always had brilliant screen technology, and once again, that's the case on the Samsung Galaxy S6. The Super AMOLED display offers clear, crisp whites against pure blacks, meaning even dark scenes are shown off perfectly.
    The 5.1-inch display now packs more pixels than ever before - 1440 x 2560 in fact, which matches the Galaxy Note 4 but with a higher PPI of 577 - which means you're looking at the sharpest display on the market.
    The QHD level of screen was started by LG last year with the G3, but as that was based on LCD technology it left the screen a little dark and power hungry, as each pixel caused a heavier strain on the battery.
    Then the Google Nexus 6 came along, and that really impressed with its larger screen. Despite the wider display it still looked great, and when the aforementioned Note 4 came along with the same resolution, the bar was set.
    So combining the pixel count of the Note 4 with a smaller display should yield an exquisite display, right? Sadly, no. That's not to say the screen on the Samsung Galaxy S6 doesn't look brilliant - it really, really does - but I'm not sure the QHD resolution really adds that much to the mix, especially given the higher power drain it commands.
    Watching some optimized video does look nicer, and held side by side the screen is clearly sharper than a normal Full HD display.
    But we've gone way past the point of needing any more sharpness in our phones, and even 720p resolutions don't look terrible (a point well made by Matthew Hanson in his piece on the myths of screen resolution) so I'm wondering why Samsung bothered here.
    The Super AMOLED technology can make 1080p screens look phenomenal, and has been for years. And with bigger screens, the improved pixel count helps make them look next generation. But at 5.1-inch, this seems more gimmick than anything else as Samsung looks for anything it can throw into a new flagship to grab headlines.
    (Admittedly the improved resolution is needed for the Gear VR headset, where the phone is the screen and so more pixels are better. But that's not going to be a real world use for this phone for many).
    The screen on the Galaxy S6 is superb. It does still have all the real benefits of Super AMOLED, as I've mentioned, with outdoor visibility particularly strong.
    There's nothing that doesn't look amazing on it - but it does come at the cost of battery life and, well, actual cost, and I'm not sure it adds enough to warrant those sacrifices.